If you’ve ever wanted to travel to the Arctic, spending a summer in Northern Manitoba is a great option. On the coast of Hudson Bay, Manitoba’s north is full of incredible natural wonders and wildlife that you just won’t see anywhere else.

 

The must-stop destination in this outdoor wonderland is the town of Churchill. Nicknamed “The Polar Bear Capital of the World,” Churchill is located where the boreal forest meets the tundra, making it one of the best places in the world to see wildlife of all kinds.

Polar bear in the summer - Credit: Travel Manitoba

Polar bears frolic among wildflowers and berry patches. Birds flock to their nesting sites in huge numbers. Countless caribou march across the vast landscape, always wary of wolves howling in the distance.

 

Take a guided walking tour and watch polar bears on the open tundra or as they play on the coastal rocks. Or board a unique tundra vehicle, designed to make the travel fun and safe while offering a prime view of the impressive bears.

Hop aboard a boat or paddle a kayak as pods of curious beluga whales circle around, or listen to the whales’ underwater songs on a snorkeling excursion.

 

Beyond the incredible animal experiences, northern Manitoba boasts some of the most stunning landscapes on earth. Churchill is located right at the northern edge of the boreal forest and opens to the expanses of the wide open Arctic tundra. During the summer, walk through the wildflowers that cover the ground in a beautiful kaleidoscope of colour where more than 400 native plant species can be found in the area. Head to the Hudson Bay and find rocks that have been beautifully shaped by glaciers and small pockets of forest that have pushed into the tundra.

 

More adventurous travelers can also find great kayaking excursions or try to land monstrous fish in the province’s northern waterways.

 

From amazing animal experiences to the land itself, travelling to northern Manitoba’s Arctic region is truly an adventure that you will cherish for life. Pack your hiking boots and head out into the wild.

 

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